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Super Warner Bros Brawl is a parody of Super Smash Bros Brawl using Warner Bros characters (duh)

Gameplay

The Super Warner Bros series is a departure from many fighting games; instead of winning by depleting an opponent's life bar, Warner Bros players seek to knock opposing characters off a stage. Each player has a damage total, represented by a percentage, which rises as damage is taken and can exceed 100%, with a maximum damage of 999%. As this percentage rises, the character can be knocked progressively farther by an opponent's attacks. To KO an opponent, the player must send that character flying off the edge of the stage, which is not an enclosed arena but rather an area with open boundaries, many suspended in an otherwise empty space. When knocked off the stage, a character may use jumping moves in an attempt to return; some characters have longer-ranged jumps and may have an easier time "recovering" than others. Additionally, characters have different weights, making it harder for heavier opponents to be knocked off the edge, but reciprocally harder for them to recover once sent flying.

While games such as Street Fighter and Tekken require players to memorize relatively lengthy and complicated button-input combinations often specific to only a particular character, Super Warner Bros uses the same control combinations to access all moves for all characters. Characters are additionally not limited to only facing opponents, instead being allowed to run around freely on the stage. The game focuses more on aerial and platforming skills than other fighting games, with relatively larger, more-dynamic stages rather than a simple flat platform. Warner Bros. also implements blocking and dodging mechanics. Grabbing and throwing other characters is also possible.

Various weapons and power-ups can be used in battle to inflict damage, recover health, or dispense additional items. They fall randomly onto the stage in the form of items from Warner Cartoons. such as anvils, hammers, and bombs The nine multiplayer stages are locations taken from or in the style of Warner franchises, such as Toontown from Who Framed Roger Rabbit or Acme Labs from . Although stages are rendered in three dimensions, players can only move within a two-dimensional plane. Stages are dynamic, ranging from simple moving platforms to dramatic alterations of the entire stage. Each stage offers unique gameplay and strategic motives, making the chosen stage an additional factor in the fight.

In the game's single-player mode, the player chooses a character with which to battle a series of computer-controlled opponents in a specific order, attempting to defeat them with a limited number of lives in a limited amount of time per challenger. While the player can determine the difficulty level and number of lives, the same series of opponents are always fought. If the player loses all of their lives or runs out of time, they have the option to continue at the cost of a considerable sum of their overall points. This mode is referred to as Classic Mode in sequels. The single-player mode also include two minigames, "Break the Targets" and "Board the Platforms", in which the objective is to break each target or board multiple special platforms (duh). The goal must be achieved without falling off each character-specific stage. A "Training Mode" is also available in which players can manipulate the environment and experiment against computer opponents without the restrictions of a standard match.

Up to four people can play in multiplayer mode, which has specific rules predetermined by the players. Stock and timed matches are two of the multiplayer modes of play. This gives each player a certain amount of lives or a selected time limit, before beginning the match. Free for all or team battles are also a choice during matches using stock or time. A winner is declared once time runs out, or if all players except one or a team has lost all of their lives. A multiplayer game may also end in a tie if two or more players have the same score when time expires, which causes the round to end in sudden death.

The most prominent Brawl-Melee change is the new physics. Generally, the game plays slower - every veteran has a slower fall speed, L-cancelling has been removed, and characters must wait a slight amount of time before being able to Meteor Cancel. Most notably, the air dodge does not involve characters shifting in a direction - instead, characters continue on whatever path they were moving before the air dodge. This new air dodge does not put characters into a helpless state, and also makes wavedashing impossible. Because of this, some consider Super Warner Bros Melee to be superior to Super Warner Bros Brawl. New to Brawl, there is also a buffer system, which makes pulling off certain moves or strings of moves easier. This allows for the player to input a move within 10 frames of the previous move ending.

There have been multiple improvements and additions. There are no true spikes in Brawl; all attacks that have a downwards angle are Meteor Smashes but they cannot be meteor-canceled as early as they could be in Melee. All characters can now do something similar to a Meteor Smash with the addition of the Footstool Jump. Characters can grab an edge if they're facing the wrong way which lowers the usefulness of some attacks such as Bugs's attacks. Characters can Pummel pummel faster and some can Crawl crawl, while others can Glide glide or wall cling, and all of them can Swim swim.

However, there are some changes that were not liked. Hitstun in Brawl is significantly decreased and can be air dodged or attacked out of; this makes true combos almost nonexistent. Despite this, certain attacks have extreme hitlag. Not all characters can Meteor Cancel by jumping, and the window for dash-dancing is so small it loses almost all its usefulness. Tether Recoveries are generally less useful than the wall-grappling they replaced. Characters must wait an amount of time before being able to move after grabbing an edge. Shieldstun is also drastically decreased, has increased Perfect Shield window, and it only takes 7 frames to shield drop, making the game even more focused on defensive game. There is also a landing lag glitch on several characters (not all) that makes them get the landing lag the next time it lands from the air if using a move that makes helpless and grabs the ledge after using a such move.

Aside from the inclusion of new characters, stages and items, there are various other changes, including the addition of the Final Smash. Grab release mechanics have changed, allowing for more grab release chain grabs. Wave Dashing has been removed. CPUs generally gained an AI increase but do not DI very much - perhaps because it has been limited, although easier to do. Grabbing a character does not restore their double jump(s), and short hopping is made easier as characters are a bit slower at jumping. Smash Taunts do not end if the user flinches; he has to be KO'd to end it early. Up smashes can be performed while running. Some characters' smashes and tilts can be angled up or down. Characters can now pivot grab. If a move is extremely close to hitting another character, it will be a glancing blow and a few sparks will show up. All characters now have three taunts instead of one.

Outside of the main game, players can build custom stages and save snapshots and replays. Melee's Adventure Mode has evolved into The Subspace Emissary, while Event Matches have selectable difficulties and the Home-Run Contest puts a temporary shield around the platform - all of these modes can also be played in Co-op. Players can also play Wi-Fi online in various modes.

Itens

  • Elmer's shotgun
  • Bomb
  • Dynamite
  • TNT
  • The dip
  • Hammer
  • Light Hammer
  • Anvils
  • Wakko's gag bag
  • Dot's pet
  • Yakko's Paddleball
  • Carrot
  • Carrot Cake
  • Canon
  • Mousetrap
  • Darkwing Duck Gas Gun
  • Eddie's Gun
  • Pinky and Brain's Human Suit
  • Yosemite's Guns
  • ACME Rocket
  • Final Smash

Stages

  • Forest (Looney Tunes)
  • Acme Acres (Tiny Toon Adventures)
  • Warner Bros Studius (Animaniacs)
  • Toontown (Who Framed Roger Rabbit)
  • Acme Labs (The Pinky and the Brain)
  • Final Destination
  • Lake (Elmer's Candid Camera)
  • Burbank (Animaniacs)
  • Acme Looniversity (Tiny Toon Adventures)
  • Tom and Jerry's Home (Tom and Jerry)
  • Tasmania (Taz)
  • Elmyra's house (Tiny Toon Adventures)
  • Woody Forest (Woody Woodpecker)
  • Maroon Studios (Who Framed Roger Rabbit)
  • The Water Tower (Animaniacs)
  • Warnerstock (Wakko's Wish)
  • Slappy's House (Animaniacs)
  • Dr. Scraty's Office (Animaniacs)
  • Robyn's House (Tom and Jerry: The Movie)
  • Basketball Stadium (Space Jam)
  • Desert (Road Runner)
  • St. Canard (Nightwing Duck)

Characters

Soundtrack

Looney tunes theme

Looney tunes theme

The Looney Tunes Show Episode- Intro

The Looney Tunes Show Episode- Intro

Who Framed Roger Rabbit theme

Who Framed Roger Rabbit theme

Smile, Darn Ya, Smile!- Who Framed Roger Rabbit Soundtrack (Lyics)

Smile, Darn Ya, Smile!- Who Framed Roger Rabbit Soundtrack (Lyics)

Karaoke -MIDI-

Karaoke -MIDI-

Animaniacs Theme- Instrumental Version

Animaniacs Theme- Instrumental Version

Karaoke) -MIDI-

Karaoke) -MIDI-

Freakazoid Instrumental Opening

Freakazoid Instrumental Opening

Woody Woodpecker - Everybody Thinks I'm Crazy

Woody Woodpecker - Everybody Thinks I'm Crazy

Rita and Runt intro

Rita and Runt intro.wmv

Slappy Squirrel Theme Song

Slappy Squirrel Theme Song

Tom And Jerry The Movie Opening

Tom And Jerry The Movie Opening

Space Jam Theme Song

Space Jam Theme Song

Darkwing Duck — Instrumental Theme (Music Only) -FULL, HQ-

Darkwing Duck — Instrumental Theme (Music Only) -FULL, HQ-

Final Destination - Super Smash Bros

Final Destination - Super Smash Bros. Brawl

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